Archive for the 'web' Category

Resume 2.0

The web has become so integrated in many of our lives that it has fundamentally changed how we do things. We order groceries online. We buy roses for that special someone in another city the day of their special day from our laptop while still in bed. We now even have a day to celebrate this glorious place we call The Internet.

Cut to 2007 — and you are looking for a job — and the way you represent yourself to a potential employer hasn’t changed since 1994 — the old-school, vintage, Microsoft Word resume.

I won’t go into the drawbacks and issues of depending on a Microsoft Word document as the “definition of you” in a job application — that could be an article itself.

The web hasn’t changed the idea of a “resume” in a job application, but it has changed the game in that employers can now research candidates. As an employer, I regularly google potential candidates, check up on their myspace and/or facebook profiles, and generally e-stalk them a little bit to really find out what they are about. If the candidate has a blog, even better. A perfect opportunity to get some dirt!

Whats interesting to me is how job candidates and society will react to this change in information power. What I see happening is a new, improved, Resume 2.0 — an “entity” online that represents you, that can be tagged and categorized with meaningful data, musings and blog posts associated with it, and a online, living “profile” of who you are, what you can do, and what you can do.

Resume 1.0 — the vintage, Microsoft Word doc was a file with some data about you.

Resume 2.0 — will be a robust, online entity of you as a job seeker — that uses your data to work for you – connect you with the employers that are looking for “entities” like you, expose meaningful information about you, and improve the way you are represented digitally.

Recruitment Videos

A couple of weeks ago, The Daily Show’s Demetri Martin tackled video resumes giving further evidence that this meme won’t die. If the last few months of press is to be believed, in the next several years we will experience our resumes morph from the familiar boilerplate my-life-in-a-microsoft-word-template one-sheet into a multimedia event. The widespread availability of video production tools and the rise of media sharing sites it is assumed will (and, as implicitly suggested, should) allow companies and universities to recruit in the same way Bunim/Murray cast for The Real World. In an article last month, The New York Times noted that beyond beginning to film themselves for video resumes, people are starting to hire media coaches to ensure their video presents the image the applicant is attempting to project.

For job applicants in creatives spaces this certainly makes a lot of sense. Thinking about the sorts of positions for which I’ve hired in the past I can’t imagine sitting through dozens of videos from Software Engineers being anymore efficient than reading a cover letter. On the other side of the fence, I can’t help but cringe picturing a hiring manager watching a video clip of me attempting to be entertaining and engaging while communicating my offerings. The whole thing just seems like awkwardsville city.

Though I’ve not seen any press about it I can moreso picture the converse. In attempting to recruit quality candidates, it seems plausible for HR departments to spend time making videos of their work places in order to get attention and attract more candidates. Professional production could be more easily justified for those on the other side of the table given the cost and man-power expense of reaching job candidates.

I’m sure it was not intended to be a recruitment video, but Connected Ventures80’s-movie-style office rockout lip-synch clip to the song Flagpoll Sitta certainly works as such. Looking through the comments there are plenty of inquiries as to where one could apply for a job. Searching YouTube for “web developer jobs“, there are a couple of videos more specifically geared towards recruiting. Even Google has made one which focuses on the recruitment of female engineers.